Videos

Attention! How to present so your audience gives a s#!t

TRANSCRIPT


Jeffrey Pease:
So let me just do a time check here. Yeah. I'm going to give maybe another four minutes for people to come in. In the meantime, uh, if anybody has any particular things that you're coming with that you want to get better at in your presentation or your meeting presence or your communication, uh, this might be a good time to just sort of blurt those out. Some of them will be addressed in line. Some of them I may try to address in Q and. A, but it'd be wonderful for me to get to know you guys a little bit and understand a little bit more about why you chose to, to give an hour to this. So does anybody want to be brave? Yeah.


Audience Member:
Um, what's present for me right now is a lot of my meetings are taking place remotely through the chat. Um, so I'm very interested in please come in, come in. I'm very interested in, yeah, like better presentation and presence like in those contexts.


Jeffrey Pease:
Okay. So Chad you were talking about what we're doing while we're just waiting for everybody to gather in was talking about asking people to say a little bit about what they're hoping to get out of this. And Chad was the brave first speaker and he was talking about a lot of his meetings are on teleconference. So say more about what you want to get out about that.


Audience Member:
Um, okay. I suspect that it's much the same, but I'm just curious if there's any kind of extra tips, tricks, tools, practices that you have that you found to be like very good situations.


Jeffrey Pease:
Okay, great. Great. That's a really good question. I don't have specific material on that, but I'll try to get to it in Q. And. And it's something I've been exploring myself recently. Like for example, I've learned that the exercise that actors do of helping their voice aim and hit directly at the person that they're talking to works on Skype. I didn't know if it would, but even if you're throwing your voice over 3000 miles, sort of pointing it right at their center instead of over their shoulder or at your desk does actually make a difference in how you come through. Um, and uh, my, my friend Carol who showed up to help by the way, actress, coach, trainer, keynote speaker, um, does performance coaching for a living, and training. Um, she has many things to say about, about questions like that. Cool. Okay. Other brave souls.


Audience Member:
We're about to train a load of people to give presentations for us across the country. Oh Wow. Okay. Question is about teaching those people.


Jeffrey Pease:
Yeah, sure. Yeah. Uh, um, well first of all, do, do that. Don't, don't just leave them dangling because people are terrified and, uh, often feel very, um, you know, just just sort of fun equipped and it's not about the technology or whatever the product is that they're explaining. Right? These are transferable skills. I come from high tech where we're just bloody awful at this. We're just horrible at it. And so that's a big market for me. That's where I made most of my career. But no matter what area of business you're in, um, yeah, I mean, I think the number one thing is to give people that training and it's not a technical training. It's an empathy in communication and storytelling technique training. So we can always talk more about that after, um, you know, when, when the pizza comes. Okay. Very cool. Anybody else where we've got a good full room? Uh, I think we're ready to start, but does one other person perhaps want to say what they're specifically hoping to get out of this?


Jeffrey Pease:
No, really? Come on. Somebody here. Here's a trick, by the way, as a facilitator, you eat what you do is say, does anybody want to talk about that? Really? Anybody can go. It usually works. Oh come on. What are you hoping to get?


Audience Member:
yeah. So, um, we have a new brand new business kind of moving into a new market from initial thoughts and just, I'm just trying to figure out the best way to go about, um, marketing, getting the word out there and we have a couple of thoughts but just to uh, get


Jeffrey Pease:
great. Gotcha, Gotcha. Okay. Yeah, so there's two streams of work I usually engage in one it, but the one that I'm probably most known for is actually getting the message, getting the story in place. And then the, the, the performance presentation piece that we're going to talk about today, um, is actually kind of my second stream of work. So we may actually need to talk at some point more about the first. Yeah. Um, you know about, well, what did it was, what is it we have to say, uh, you know, as opposed to the process of how do we actually present it. Now the two are intimately connected as you're going to see, but maybe we need to talk a little more about that. And I can also point you at some resources about that, that you can look at on your own. Okay. So that's a good after talk. Yes sir.


Audience Member:
Uh, we're launching a new product soon. It's inventory accounting management. So it's never someone's top of mind.


Jeffrey Pease:
Oh my, my, my world boring. At least at first glance is my world B to B enterprise software.


Audience Member:
Yeah. So you might people, yeah, we're looking at the package that up and get people excited about it and help them understand the value proposition. When we get people, they love it. Kids for listen.


Jeffrey Pease:
Oh, so classic in Tech. If we get them to that Oh shit moment. Oh my God, this is so good. The trouble is that's two thirds down the pipe, right? It's at the, it's at the awesome demo or whatever. Please come in. Uh, so it's how do you hook them to get them to that stage? And a big part of that, and this is again, more message formation than message delivery, is separating claim from proof. We want to prove before we've actually gotten them clear on what, what there were proven. Uh, that's, that's kind of a tech problem. So separating out the claim part, uh, and, and then understanding certain other things about your market in terms of how you need to focus your message. So it's kind of the same answer as your question, which is that's more the other stream of work, but this will connect to it and give you some ideas for it. Okay. All right. Well I think, I think that we are ready to go and wow, this, we are the perfect size audience. So we had 34 people sign up. Um, over half of them didn't show up and many of you probably didn't sign up, so you're not, some of those 34 says, somehow somehow in whatever mysterious way, we wound up with the perfect audience for this talk. And if they're lining up outside the doors, we'll do it again at one.


Jeffrey Pease:


So attention, welcome to the wonderful world of attention. And you coming here, you gave me this huge gift of your attention because what's more precious, right? I mean, apps and social media pay big money to compete for seconds of your attention. And here you are, your phones or in your pockets and you're giving me mostly and you're giving me a whole hour of the most pay, maybe the most precious thing you have your attention. So what can I give you in return for that huge, huge gift? Well, here's what I'm going to give you first. The big secret of attention. I'm going to tell you a secret. Now, I know it gets a little disingenuous. People talk about the five secrets of this or the 10 secrets of that. And you know, they just call anything a secret. But there is a little bit of a secret here.


Jeffrey Pease:


And once you learn this secret, it will change your life. And I am not kidding about that. Understanding the secret of attention can grow your business. It can change your presence at work, it can affect your personal relationships, it can affect any part of your life where communication occurs, which is pretty much every part of your life. So you know the secret, please use this awesome power only for good. So the big secret of attention that's pivotal. Once you know the secret, let me go a little more into technique. Once you understand attention and how it works and how fragile it is, then we get to the three keys to earning attention, not stealing attention, right? Uh, clickbait articles can steal your attention for seconds at a time, but it's like the short version of a bad one night stand. It's like you, you, you, you, you sorta, okay, you may go there, but then you kind of regret it afterwards.


Jeffrey Pease:


You don't feel your time has been well used. So I don't mean stealing attention. I don't want people to feel worse in the morning because they've given you their attention. I want them to feel better. So there are three keys to not stealing attention but rather earning it. That's what I'm going to teach you. And then because there's a lot of drill down in detail that could occur under each of those keys and just going to teach you some starter techniques. Just a few little things that you can absolutely start using today. So my goal is that your communication, whether it's a presentation or a high stakes conversation, gets better today. Now, to understand attention, to be set up for the big secret of attention, the easiest way is to test our own. So this is a test of your attention and we have to do this in a very particular way, which is silently, each of you is going to do this test silently so that everybody else can get the full benefit of the test too. All right? And if you can't hear the audio on this, I'll just narrate it. It's not audio intensive. So this is called the monkey business solution.


Video:


Count the number of times the players in white pass the ball.


Video:


For people who haven't seen or heard about a video like this before, about half miss the gorilla. If you knew about the gorilla, you probably saw it, but did you notice the curtain changing color or the player on the black team leaving the game.


Video:


Let's rewind and watch it again. And there goes a player is changing from red to gold. Okay. And that's the Monkey business illusion.


Jeffrey Pease:


Okay, so I've got to ask, okay, I've got to ask how many people saw the gorilla? Okay, how many people would admit that they didn't see the gorilla? Okay, so 40% in this room, maybe instead of 50 and unusually alert crowd. Now that was, that's this research that showed that 50% of people didn't see a gorilla walking across the screen and pounding its chest, waving, saying, hey, here I am. I am a gorilla. This was done in the 1990s so no iPhones, no android, no Instagram, no snapchat, none of the distractions that fragment our attention far worse now than they did 10 or 15 years ago. And still 50% of people miss a gorilla walking across the screen or in person. By the way, this, the results are the same if you have the basketball players in person and the gorilla comes in and walks on. Yeah. So if that, if it was that bad, then how bad is it now? Right? How much more fragmented as our attention now, how much harder is it to secure attention now? So here's the lesson. There's what the eye sees. There's the wide angle lens of our sensory apparatus. So there's what the eye sees and there's what the brain can attend at any one time, which is much, much less.


Jeffrey Pease:


Especially when you're focusing on one thing. There's no such thing as multitasking. So when you're focusing on one thing, you're not focusing on another. So in that gap between what the eye sees and what the brain attends, you can hide an entire gorilla.


Jeffrey Pease:


So when you're trying to get people's attention, it's important to know that it's important to know just how hard it is to get and just how easily it is lost.


Jeffrey Pease:


Now, if that wasn't bad enough news in terms of trying to say market A, B, Two B enterprise software solution, what does make it in what the brain does attend to mostly gets processed way before the neo cortex ever comes into play. So this is what I like to call the hindbrain guide to data processing. The flow chart looks something like this. A stimulus comes in and my hindbrain, my reptilian early brain says, one Kennedy eat me. If not good, proceed to step two. Can I eat? Yes.


Jeffrey Pease:


If not, well darn, but then proceed to step three. If I can't eat it, it can eat me behind brain then says, well then can I mate with it? Yeah, maybe, maybe not. If so, okay.


Jeffrey Pease:


Hm, will it mate? So we're still no where near the part of the brain that processes you. Marketing messages, unless the marketing messages are at a very basic level, which does sometimes happen somewhere beyond those concerns come social status, belonging, Aka, how's my hair? Right? That's the next stage of the hind brain. And then maybe the neo cortex starts to come in. When we get to step six, which is everything else, everything that was not part of those basic drives.


Jeffrey Pease:


And then comes what we want to communicate. A, disruptive transformational cloud based solution for enterprise contract management, a k a, whatever it is you want to say, whatever it is you want to sell. Okay, so we, in asking for someone else's attention, we start out pretty far down their hierarchy of needs. So if we want to get them to engage on what we're interested in talking about, what we want to put in their heads, we do it, but our chances of doing it improve greatly if we understand what we're up against. Now this might be depressing, but the good news is everybody else that wants to talk to your potential customer, your boss, your colleague has the same problem and now you among all of those people know it. Now you understand something about what that problem is, what you're up against. So you are now prepared to receive the wisdom. You are now prepared to understand the big secret of attention. You Ready? Okay. Here it is. The big, powerful secret of attention. It's a two parter.


Jeffrey Pease:


There ain't much, there's very little attention available for you from other people at any given moment. So there ain't much attention to go around. And by default it ain't on you. It is not focused on you. So there's a part of every one of us, ourselves and every person we want to listen to us, but has this voice going on in the head, the voice that says, God, people are so selfish. I shouldn't think so much about themselves. They should think more about me. So that's it. The big secret of attention there is not much. It is not focused on you and you have to earn it.


Jeffrey Pease:


So if you're not completely depressed by that, we can now go on how you earn it. And that is a combination of an overriding principle and three techniques, three areas of technique. The overriding principle is you earn attention by paying attention. This is the attention version of that old Stephen Covey thing, seek first to be understood and then to be understood. See, I can reverse that. Seek first to understand and then to be understood. What that means in an attention context is you pay attention to the other person and what they need and are likely to respond to. And then out of that you earn their attention. Now you can understand that and still do it skillfully or not to do it requires three key principles. The three keys to earning attention, our purpose, story and performance. So purpose is why are you communicating? Hopefully you're not just babbling at random. Why are you talking to or presenting to this person or this group at this time? What are you hoping to accomplish in the world or in that person's head? The why is the most important and we'll talk about that later.


Jeffrey Pease:


Second story, once you understand your intent, what you're trying to accomplish for yourself and for your audience, you can then craft a story that will engage them and enroll them in that and story is much more powerful than information. Finally, performance. How do you take it? I'm going to start moving around a little more as I say that in performance because I'm standing still too much here. How do you take your purpose into a story and then how do you use everything? You've got your voice, your body, your rising and falling intonation and volume. How do you use every thing at your command to perform your story? It's where being the screenwriter stops and being the actor begins. So let's start with purpose. Because when you're creating your communication, you should always start with purpose. So the reason you should always start with purpose is because it is your north star and also because it's a neglected area. So if you know what you want to happen, not what you want to say that story. Okay? It's important to separate those two. Purpose is what you want to make happen. And story is how you get there. So the why of your communication naturally guides you towards the what? The story, and it can even guide you toward the how. The performance. So always start there. And in fact, excuse me, we're going to start there for you in just a few minutes. But there is one more thing about purpose. How many people here are familiar with the idea of the buyer's journey?


Jeffrey Pease:


So about half the room is familiar. So this is this notion that there are these steps that people go through. We used to talk about sales stages, what we sort of push people through. Now we talk about the buyer's journey. And how we help people go through their own process and we communicate to different points in that process. There are many versions of this. I'm going to show you a simple one because you can use purpose map to the buyer's journey to figure out where to spend your time, where to put the focus of your communication goes like this. So simple version of the buyer's journey. There are more complicated ones. Awareness, I know or I don't know that I have a problem as a potential customer consideration. I know I have a problem. What kinds of solutions are out there? Who should I be talking to?


Jeffrey Pease:


Who should I be thinking of? What are these things do decision I am knocking out options and picking one to go with and that's where buying occurs. Now you can do the same thing for buy in, right? I'm not, I don't have a lot to sell you today, but I want your buy in for this framework so I can still use this. So, for example, if your goal is to move somebody from not really knowing they have a problem or not knowing how serious the problem is to looking at particular situation, uh, solutions to looking at solutions and starting to consider them, then your presentation should be very light on technical detail and differentiation of the solution. And it should be very heavy on what I call problem land. It's reminding people of the pain they're in, bringing it to their attention. So if the purpose, if I'm ultimately trying to sell some Rogaine or some kind of baldness treatment and my audience is here, I'm going to spend a lot of time reminding them that their vault, okay, I'm not going to give them a lot of detail on my particular solution to that problem.


Jeffrey Pease:


I'm just going to try to remind them that they are bald, that they have a problem and teas, that this problem might have some solutions out there. Okay, so it's a very specific allocation of time. Now, what if on the other hand, they come in already knowing they're bald and already knowing that they would prefer to have it be different than that? You know, I mean some people look great ball, but let's say that they want to do something about it and they already know that well if I just go around reminding them of that over and over again, I'm not making good use of their time and therefore of my time. So instead I want to focus on leaning on the benefits of potential solutions and the positive consequences of solving the problem. And I will touch on my solution as one of the things that does that stuff, but I won't dig too hard because my goal is to move them from consideration toward decision.


Jeffrey Pease:


Now look, moving. Getting people's attention for any period of time is hard. Trying to accomplish many, many different purposes in one communication or one meeting is usually too hard. So you can be much more purposeful and pointed if you figure out what's my object, not just overall, but for this meeting, this presentation, this talk, and then I can draw a circle and I can focus. And then when we get to the point where they have to really look at and eliminate or choose potential solutions, then we'll have a different presentation. We'll have a different meeting, we'll have a different focus. And the problem that many high tech companies have that I'm sure those of us that are in that business can relate to, is they try to give this presentation in the first meeting and then they wonder why people aren't attending to it because they didn't pay attention to where somebody probably is in their journey at this moment. And therefore they've missed, they have just gone right past the customer or they've tried to do all of these, which is why the presentation has 50 slides in it for the 15 minute meeting that you have. And then you wonder why you're kind of out of breath out of time and why the other person look so bored.


Jeffrey Pease:


So this model works even if the journey is one of buy in. So let's say that you don't have something to sell, but you're selling an initiative within your company. You're selling a proposal for a new way of doing business, right? So you're not, there's not a contract, there's not money changing hands, but you still need buy in even if you don't need by ink. And so we're, we're somewhat in that situation here today. So my purpose is to move you from awareness, some awareness of the problem too. A lot of awareness of the problem, a glaring awareness of the problem and then to acceptance of a framework for solving the problem. And I say a framework because we have an hour, there's a lot of drill down on every piece of the framework. So if I give you too much depth of technique, it's more than I can deliver and it's more than you can assimilate. So touch the problem, frame the solution kind of in between these two stages here, and then stop and pick up next time if there's more to do purpose, focus intent, which naturally very naturally drive us for the next stage, which is story.


Jeffrey Pease:


So before we move onto that though, let's do a little exercise ourselves. Pick a presentation or a communication that you have coming up or you can do a moot court on one you've just done that you might have to do again in the future. So picking your head, a meeting, a presentation, a communication, the high stakes one on one conversation that you're going to do. Does everybody have one? Okay, now in your mind, complete the sentence. My purpose in this presentation or communication is steak. 30 seconds to do that. Raise your hand when you have one.


Jeffrey Pease:


Harder than it looks. Okay. Raise your hand when you have one. Okay. All right. Uh, I'm gonna Start with Chad, right? Okay. Chad, what is your upcoming communication angel client? I worked with this individual before in a different company and this is about a year later. Um, and so my purpose of this next communication within this to move them from the consideration point, I've talked to them about preview potential solutions and now I want to put forward three options for engaging and have them decide on an option. Right. Great. And so is it your goal that at the end of that meeting you want them to have made the decision or like you'll set a time, you'll lay out the options, you'll set a timeframe and then a decision will get made? Yeah, I would love to facilitator. Okay, great. Okay. So you know, your purpose, your purpose, this is to get a decision.


Jeffrey Pease:


Yes. All right, fantastic. So you know where to focus, you know what to review lightly or leave out and you know what to put in or at least you have the equipment to begin to know that and then we'll get the story. Sure. Okay. Uh, what about you sir? Um, object to 70, so that direction for our company. Ah, very good. Internal One, two, they tie company and yet my job's just to get by. [inaudible] fantastic. Okay. And will you get that in that meeting or will there you see that in a couple of stages or assist the culmination. Okay. That means we've done awareness already. So I think it's still an unlucky in exactly what's gonna happen. Okay, great. So spend just a little bit of time before you do that, kind of looking at the diagram and drawing your circle. You know, even if your circle falls across a couple of stages and then you know what's in it, what's out of it, and then you can really focus your time and really nail your story. Okay. Great. Great. One more. One more. Who's got one? Anybody can go.


Audience Member:


Okay. Um, I'm looking to be better in the awareness section. So our first conversation, like, do you like the typical software? Like initial conversation? There's sand, the problem, uh, Devo and the decision. Deadlock tends to be the consideration for it, but my awareness is historically focused more on what's your problem? Tell me about it. You already came to me. So I'm assuming you have some level of awareness. But uh, based on what you're saying is probably more important than I think about communicating, you know, overall consideration of why, you know, even though you came to me, you still might not have full consideration of how the overall market of like a piece of software could save you time or money. It's those to really block in. Okay, you're right. I should be considering this. Cause sometimes you have like a hint of consideration of the full, you know, you're right. I do need to, I am now fully aware of them. Sometimes they're just asking for your underwear.


Jeffrey Pease:


Yeah. And there's awareness of problem and there's also sometimes a kind of a little sub thing, which is it helps if they're aware that you're aware of the problem too. Like that you understand the problem the way they do or the way they do. Plus you can add some more insight to it. Now there are side effects. You gotta be careful with that one because if, if your version of showing awareness is in today's modern world, life is tough. And computers are important. Then you just look like you're kind of trying to teach them their job. Only you know less about it than they do. So you have to be careful of you play that. But it is good. Not only that they know they have a problem, but that kind of, they know you understand the problem in a real, true, empathetic way. So getting better at awareness. Awesome. Really good purpose. All right. Unless anybody has a another one that they're burning to share, we'll go on, but keep your purpose in mind because we're going to build on it. Okay.


Jeffrey Pease:


Oh, and by the way, if I just back up for a second, my example, my purpose for this presentation, which you saw on the buyer's journey thing, I want to introduce and get you guys to buy in on the framework for earning attention without down into so much detail that gets overwhelming. Okay, so on purpose drives story, story is much, much greater than data data, raw information speeds and feeds. Data by itself is like these pearls just kind of rolling around randomly. Nobody can keep track of where 40 50 pearls on. You put those pearls on a nice necklace with 1 cent worth of fishing line and all of a sudden it's so easy to keep track of. It's so easy to wrap your mind around. It's so easy to put around your neck if you can work that damn little class that they always seem to have. So story is that crucial pennies worth of fishing line story transforms raw data into something riveting. So you need one. you really, really need a story.


Jeffrey Pease:


Now here's a little nuance for you. Your story is not your PowerPoint and if you're creating your power point, assuming you, this is a slide where kind of interaction, if you're creating your PowerPoint, not knowing what your story is, you better step back a little because you need to know what your story is before you start putting it in slides. Otherwise, it's like you're trying to shoot a movie and you've hired big actors in CGI companies and you're building sets in, you're on location and people say, well, what's the script? You're like script, right? So your story is not your power point. And don't just start messing with slides in the vain. Hope that your story will appear. See if you can really have one before you begin.


Jeffrey Pease:


Now here's what you're gonna find out when you start to construct your story, you know way too much and it will not all fit. So we know what we know about our solution, our business, our initiative. And it is literally like the old spy movies. You'll know too much and we try to put everything in. This is a typical high tech presentation. The conclusion seems simple, but chances are the audience will never go with you on that journey. They will never reach that in. They will never reach the conclusion you want. So what do you do when you know too much? Well, don't go with what you know. Go with what you know about what the other person needs to receive in this interaction to hit your purpose and take stuff out. So if you want to make a point, we talk about a story as a way to make a point.


Jeffrey Pease:


Let's get literal about what it means to make a point. We literally want to make a point like a cave man made an Arrow head or a spear point. We take that big rock, that big piece of Flint and we napped little chunks away. We remove material, we take away all of that crap until what's left is thin, sharp and pointy and it fits into that little aperture of attention and if it goes in there and a few secure interest, then it's a barbed pointed expands. They'll give you a little more attention, a little more attention, a little more attention. So attention is earned in stages, so take stuff away to make a point.


Jeffrey Pease:


Now there are a lot of ways to do that. I do one particular way that I'll tell you about which is called the message matrix. This is something I've learned the bones of and then developed over the last 20 years. It's a discipline structure for boiling your value for boiling your value down to simple messages that cell. So it gives you a framework for what to keep and what to take away. And I can follow up by email with a link to a video on that and some information that I can share with you guys. It's not a publicly available video, but I'll, I'll share it with you in this audience. We're not gonna talk much about the message matrix here because we simply don't have time, but it is one way to get down to a point in your story. It's not the only structure available.


Jeffrey Pease:


There are many stories, structure inspirations, the basic structure. Once upon a time and then there was a big bad wolf and then the wolf was killed and they lived happily ever after. Right? That's Little Red Riding Hood. That's the brothers Grimm. There is the sitcoms structure. There is the Pixar story spine. The structure that every Pixar movie is based on which you can Google and read more about. There is the classic slasher horror movies structure. Perhaps not the ideal structure for your average sales presentation because the ending isn't always that happy, but it's a simple structure. Hey, let's go do a bunch of really obviously bad idea things. A lot of people die, the killer dies or does he write? That's a structure, right? It's classic. So no shortage of inspirations for a structure of your story from the message matrix onto classic Hollywood movies. But it starts from your purpose then flows into your story. So let's flow into story. So for the purpose that you had in your head, whether you set it out loud or not for the purpose you had in your head, finish this sentence. My story is


Jeffrey Pease:


So you had a purpose, you had an interaction coming up, you have a purpose, finish the sentence in your head. My story is, and then if you're feeling really brave or if I start pointing at you because you haven't spoken yet, go ahead and say, I think my story is does anybody who hasn't previously spoken willing you say what their story is? Um, so for just the preferences of my purpose scaffold is that,


Audience Member:


um, I would even coming up and I'm discussing with another colleague on some charities that we can potentially partner with [inaudible] and [inaudible] stuff. It super clear. Yeah. Um, today my story is I guess that we should include, uh, based on the charities that we're already working with. Um, we should put cherries that work in other rooms such as environmental friendly philanthropies, ones that work in different health or with different bike address, different health problems. And uh, yeah. Just to explore, uh, a wider realm of philanthropic giving.


Jeffrey Pease:


Great. So that kind of hovers between a story and an extension of purpose. So spend a little time thinking about what the story is, like, why that's true or companies that have done that and how it's worked for well for them. So think about how that becomes not just an extension of your purpose, but a narrative. You're, you're halfway there. Just go all the way there. Cool. Cool. That's really good. One. So, uh, who else?


Audience Member:


Yes, sir. Hub. My company is helping American companies. So I though, ah, yeah. So my story is coming in and goes to China Company has problems, company hires me or what I'm I consoles to help sort it out.


Jeffrey Pease:


And they live happily ever after. Right. So that, that's a story. Now. It's not a story. If I, if you just say, yeah, I help people and we are awesome, right? You know, you don't want to be like the gorilla. Um, however, if you have stories of companies for whom you have done this, it's awesome and you have brought up a point that really needs to be made here. Who is the hero of the story? A story has a hero, right? And the hero, spoiler alert, it's not you, nor is it your product. Uh, it's usually one of these. It is the person you're addressing, but sometimes you haven't done anything for them yet. So it's the person you're addressing or people like them or people they aspire to be. So using stories of people for whom you have provided this kind of aid and the results that gain for them. That's a story that is like the very essence of a story and there is nothing more credible than that. Yeah. Right. And then you just have to be careful about how much detail to give. Right. Just so you don't run out of time. Confidentiality is one thing, but boring the shit out of people as the other. Yeah. Right. Five of the two. It's usually the greater concern.


Audience Member:


I guess. Mine is more visually based. They do a lot of graphic design. So I tried to tell the story and breakdown and why design for what they're doing. And so the story usually starts with color. How it makes them feel. That goes with files, typography, what they see in their daily lives we have to it. And then you were only out like where things are moving. Is it NAMIC it does it align with them? Yes. They feel comfortable with that then that's the right direction most of the time. Okay, great.


Jeffrey Pease:


And so, um, think about how your purpose flows into that story in a particular interaction and think about being very intentional at each given interaction with a client to move them to the decision that will be, you know, best for them and best for you. Great. Good. Okay. Who else? One more. Anybody else willing to share a story?


Jeffrey Pease:


Okay, we will keep going then. So once you have a story, how do you deliver it? And the answer is not 45 extremely detailed slides with very small type. The answer is performance. Performance is how you take a story and you bring it alive. And by bringing it alive, you engage the attention of your audience. And that is also a big part of how you are believed. So the good thing is there are people that do just this part for a living and we can learn from them. And they are called actors and rock stars, right? I mean, what do these people do? Perform. Sometimes they write the material, very often they don't. But Michael Caine and a great movie with a great script is riveting. You can't take your eyes off in Michael Caine in a crappy movie with a terrible script and he's been in many is still riveting and you still can't take your eyes off of the guy, right? So performance is really, really important to get down that last step and securing attention and oops, back up. Pippet there are many, many lessons we can learn from performers. That's such a big rich area of drill down that we just don't have much time to go into here. But let me give you the one lesson that I learned most from performers. Rehearse, rehearse, or as a wise friend of mine once told me, one less revision on your slides and one rehearsal is almost always going to make your performance better. And by the way, what is one more rehearsal mean? For most of us and most of our presentations, one rehearsal. So one full out loud rehearsal would be really good to would be even better. Zero not so good. So isn't it funny that we will stay awake till three in the morning getting those little slide transitions right and then have no time left to actually test our performance and make our performance better. So if nothing else, rehearse now performance, exercise. Complete this sentence to make my performance better on this next presentation, this next communication I'm going to do, I will blank. And there are so many answers to this. Breathing, meditation, voice lessons, going to the gym just before you know, so that you're kind of pumped up, but calm.


Chad:


Give me one or two, like what's the thing you'd like to do to make your next performance better?


Audience Member:


I love your rule of one.


Jeffrey Pease:


[inaudible] you could do a lot worse. You could do a lot worse than that one. Yeah, that's a good one. Well, here's some other options and feel free to call out if you have any of your own. Do a rehearsal practice. You're pausing instead of earth and um, take a few voice lessons, do some breathing. There's so many things that you could do and there are entire disciplines for business people around enhancing your actual loans. So many, many good options.


Jeffrey Pease:


So we are getting close to time here. Nice. Kept you through most of your precious hour. But do you guys want a few more tips before we end. I'll stay here all day. I don't mind. Grady is here and he doesn't mind. Alright, more tips, things you can use today. Start with a teaser. What's a teaser is surprising statistic. Hey, did you know that sharks actually very rarely get sucked up by tornadoes? Uh, an audience poll, the compelling video or an image, any of those teasers get people hooked right away. What was the teaser in this case? The gorilla? Yeah, the quizzes. The attention tests. The gorilla. That was the teaser. After that, everybody was kind of paying attention. What's this picture? Picture's worth a thousand words. How do I know that? Because you just got meaning of that with no words. No words at all. So more pictures, fewer words on your slides. That's a good thing.


Jeffrey Pease:


Pause. Because pausing is powerful.


Jeffrey Pease:


Errs, ums, you knows, rising inflections on sentences that aren't actually questions. All of those things we can do.


Jeffrey Pease:


Yeah. You know what strengthens here. If you need a moment to think or where you want to emphasize your point, just stop the [inaudible]. It gives you time to think increases rather than undermine. Truthfully. It makes you calmer because you find your center and receive that bonus. If you pause, whatever you say next will sound really important.


Jeffrey Pease:


Build in interaction as we've done here. And if this were a longer presentation or a workshop, we would also build in breaks. Remember we're trying to earn attention, not abuse it, not overwork it. People can only attend to any one thing for so long. So build in interaction and where it's needed. Build in breaks too. S


Jeffrey Pease:


End with a kicker like they did on the old police squad shows where you see the coffee pouring out as the credits roll and with a kicker. What's a kicker? A kicker is a little cute Stinger at the end that makes people not only want to take the next step in their journey, but it makes them want to take it with you. You want them to leave liking you and taking that next step, not just with anybody but with you. And a kicker is something at the end that helps accomplish that. And you'll see an example. So to bring it all back together, remember these three keys, start from purpose, start from purpose, build it into a story and then deliver it as a powerful performance.


Jeffrey Pease:


All guided by this overall principle that you earn attention by paying attention to the other person. In fact, in some upcoming interaction, just try in the next couple of days, just having one interaction where you're highly purposeful and your purpose is just to be helpful to that other person and see what happens. Pay attention to them and what they need. Be purposeful to be helpful and interact in that way and see what happens. Earn attention by paying attention. In other words, if you're intentional, you can say less and you can be heard more and knowing how powerful story is and knowing how powerful success stories are. I want to give you an example of this, so let me set the scene for you.


Jeffrey Pease:


It's. 10 years ago at Oracle headquarters, the lake is beautiful. The Sun is shining. There's an America's cup yacht somewhere in that lake. The allergens are in bloom. The ducks are crapping on the sidewalk as they do and somewhere in a building nearby. Larry Ellison is drinking blood out of the skull of one of his fall in that in, and I'm taking a walk and I'm taking a with me knew and me knew is an employee of mine. I'm her boss and she works out of India. So I'm her boss from thousands of miles away, a 12 and a half hour time difference. And this time that we're spending together around some meetings is the first time we've had any significant time together in person. And we've just come out of a big all hands marketing meeting where she was presenting and interacting and it didn't go all that well because honestly she talked kind of a lot and two relatively little purpose.


Jeffrey Pease:


It wasn't really intentional. It wasn't really coming through and people were kind of tuning out and it would have been possible to just let that go. She was a graphic artist. She didn't have to do all that much of that kind of interaction. But there was such potential in me knew that I didn't want to let it go. So I had a purpose. I didn't have it that lined up in this structure back then, but I had a purpose in talking to her. So as we're walking around the lake, I tell her, me knew if you were more focused and more purposeful in your communication and if you listened more to how people are taking it in and responding to you and maybe left a little more space for them to talk, you would be more powerful. It would help you and it would help your career because the higher you go, the less the hard skills like your drawing are going to matter.


Jeffrey Pease:


And the more the soft skills like how you can get yourself across are going to make a difference and a lot of people would have just brushed that off or even resented it. Right. Cause it's not that easy to have somebody, especially your boss tell you, you talk too much. Right. I mean that's not a fun thing to deliver and it's not really jolly to here either. Right. It's tough. However kindly you mean it, but me knew didn't take it that way. She took it right in and she said, wow, thank you for saying that because, and not very comfortable presenting in groups. And I kind of feel like to fit in or connect or get my share, I've got to get my brain bites in and it Kinda got to get it out right. Which is the same problem in tech marketing, right? It kinda got to get it all out.


Jeffrey Pease:


So we talked about that a little bit. I didn't have this specific structure yet, but we talked about that and man, did she take it? So let's fast forward now. 11 years later in Delhi, meaning who has a video communications business that employs nine people and growing fast and it has [inaudible] as a client or instant young. It has the gates foundation as a client. I think it's got HP as a client. It's got state governments in India for big initiatives as a client. Why? Well mean is drawing in her animation and stuff is awesome, but she doesn't even personally do most of that anymore. So it's not that these companies actually ask her to advise them on how to communicate in high stakes initiatives. In fact, she's been asked to kind of be an advisory board member for a company in a completely unrelated business, just because when she was talking to them about their communication, they realized how helpful she could be. So this is what I mean when I say, if you really absorb the idea of attention and how to work with it, it will change your life because it changed hers. And by the way, those of the nine employees she has, right? She's built a business that people are feeding their families on. Change your life in a really, really powerful way. So that is the power of paying attention to get attention. And that is the power of a success story.


Jeffrey Pease:


So I'm gonna leave you with that. And one other thing, don't hide your gorilla. Thank you.


Speaker 2:


[inaudible].